Amazon indigenous warriors beat down illegal loggers and torch their equipment, in battle for jungle’s future

(via Earth First Journal)

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A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.

Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.

Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.

The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.

(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)
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Gimme Green: The American Obsession with Lawns (2007)

Gimme Green is a humorous look at the American obsession with the residential lawn and the effects it has on our environment, our wallets and our outlook on life. From the limitless subdivisions of Florida to sod farms in the arid southwest, Gimme Green peers behind the curtain of the $40-billion industry that fuels our nation’s largest irrigated crop-the lawn.”

Some facts from the video:

* Every day more than 5,000 acres of land are converted into lawns in America.
* Lawns cover more than 41 million acres, the most irrigated crop in the U.S.
* Americans apply over 30,000 tons of pesticides to their yards every year.
* Of the 30 most used lawn pesticides, 17 are routinely detected in groundwater.
* The National Cancer Institute finds that children in households using lawn pesticides have a 6.5 times greater risk of developing leukemia.
* American lawns require 200 gallons of fresh water per person per day.
(via Films for Action)